Feedback from young people involved in SO What


Previously I ran a blog called So What Squad alongside this one, but time constraints meant I needed to fine tune my social media presence, so I am moving all the posts over to this blog. This is the sixth of six posts.

Students shared with me their thoughts about being part of SoWhat (Spellings are theirs!).

“When I first joined the SO What Squad in our school it was barely a group at all. It didn’t have a name, the school didn’t know we existed, and most of the students didn’t know what we were trying to achieve. Or even some of the teachers, for that matter. But that is exactly for me why it seemed so important to start up.

In many ways, homophobic bullying can seem a silent form of bullying. People use derogatory phrases all the time that would never be picked up on – ‘that’s so gay’, for instance – unless it was something that personally upset you, as it does for many young, LGBT students. Not only that, but it surprises a lot of people to hear the range of homophobic bullying, that many heterosexual students have experienced it too.

As part of the group, we went to an anti-bullying conference in our local area where it discussed a range of different techniques to ensure that schools and colleges have as little an amount of bullying as possible. One really interesting seminar discussed how homophobia is tackled in primary schools, not by looking out for aggressive behaviour or derogatory language as we had focused on, but by broadcasting acceptance, and teaching children that people with difference backgrounds, families, people from different races and religions, people of different sexual orientations were all ordinary people, just like everyone else. The leader of the seminar, a teacher who identified as LGBT, was able to discuss the fact that he was gay with his older students, and told us how on seeing a figure of authority, a person that they liked, as gay, the students easily accepted it, and as far as he was aware there was no homophobic bullying within that group.

I think if we were to go back and change the way we established SO What at our school, it would be less focused on the bullying, and more focused on the need for acceptance and appreciation of different people, spreading the message that diversity may seem strange and unfamiliar, but it is good. I feel we needed to spread campaigns such as ‘It Gets Better’, which has a hopeful message for victims who may feel upset or dejected. The younger that people learn that LGBT is no more a label than heterosexuality is, the quicker we can hope that in schools in the future it will be better.

Lucy, Former SoWhatSquad member.

I am a former member of the SoWhatSquad and i am proud to say that the logo design was my idea, my most creative piece yet.
Seeing homophobic bullying was very common before the group started up. The term “Gay” was used in everyones regular vocabulary. A person didnt need to actually be or identify themselves as part of LGBT to get called names and be taunted, if they showed stereotypical attirbutes of a LGBT person, they would be targeted.
The group for some was a place to retreat and feel welcome. It didnt matter if you were part of LGBT Group or just had views on the matter, everyone was treated equally. The logo which was displayed around school was a sign that our school was not going to tolerate any discrimination.

It is a shame however that the group, as former students left, is no longer as prominent in the school community, although i have noticed more students in the school which would identify themselves under the LGBT group and could be in need of a SoWhat Squad.

If i had the chance to relay or help build such groups in other schools, i think it would benefit a huge amount of people, to be themselves, to feel comfortable and to be happy in their school years.

K- Former SoWhat Member

“The so what squad helped a few people i knew come out as well as myself. Ii only had one friend who knew that i was a lesbian but apart from that my life involved a hell of a lot of lying! I didn’t know many gay people at the time and whenever i heard a conversation about homosexuals it was negative. By the time i had joined the so what club i had already come out to a lot of people and most was good and well except i had not told my family yet. The so what squad helped me tell my mum etc by providing me with a safe postive environment where i felt normal an could talk about my fears with people who were in the same position as me. The so what squad was really helpful and what have been an even greater help if i knew about it when i was figuring out i was gay i know it helped a lot of people and schools should definatlly have some sort of group to support other children.”

J- Former SoWhat Member

Another Student who went to set up So What in their college wrote this about their school experience:

As a young gay person growing up in a school with no openly gay students and staff, and an under current of homophobia amongst my peers, I felt incredibly isolated. The homophobia in the school was systemic; it was a very hostile environment and homophobia was routinely unchallenged. As a result I did not feel it was a safe space to come out in. I censor my feeling and behaviours, and became incredibly self loathing. As a result I acted out and began to perform the homophobic actions and behaviours I saw. It was only after leaving the school and that I was able to become the real me. I came out and my confidence grew: my grades improved significantly and I was able to shake off the feeling I was lying to people.

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